Measure SFL-1 Metadata


Most Recent Measure Description:
ACS Code:SFL-1
PERS Code: 
Measure Key Words:Florida Keys sewage treatment
Measure Language:Increase percentage of sewage treatment facilities and onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems receiving advanced wastewater treatment or best available technology as recorded by EDU. in Florida Keys two percent (1500 EDUs) annually.
Goal, Objective and Subobjective:2.2.11: Restore and Protect the South Florida Ecosystem
Measure Type:Indicator
ACS Shareholder: 
Comments:New measure starting in FY 2011.


Type of Measure *Yes/NoFY09FY10FY11FY12
NPGYes  IndInd
Budget (target)No  IndInd
Strategic PlanNo   Ind
KPINo   Ind
ARRANo   Ind
StateGrantNo  IndInd
* Note: The figures for all budget measures are targets. The figures for all the other types of measures are commitments established during the development of the National Water Program Guidance.


Office Information:
Office Lead:Region 4
Contact:Steven Blackburn, EPA Region 4: blackburn.steven@epa.gov | (404) 562-9397


Most Recent Measure Definition (From FY2010 or FY2010, if available):
Terms and Phrases:The septic tanks and cesspits traditionally utilized for wastewater disposal in the nutrient sensitive waters of the Florida Keys provide little to no treatment due to the Keys unique environment of poor or little soil, highly porous limestone and elevated groundwater tables. The nutrients from the poorly treated sewage is contributing to water quality and aquatic life degradation and presents a human health risk from bacteria and viruses. Florida enacted legislation in 1999 requiring all sewage treatment facilities and onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems in the Florida Keys achieve advance wastewater treatment standards or best available technology as determined by Florida Department of Environmental Protection. EDU is equivalent to wastewater effluent from one home -- 167 gallons per day per home.
Methodology for Computation of Results:The septic tanks and cesspits traditionally utilized for wastewater disposal in the nutrient sensitive waters of the Florida Keys provide little to no treatment due to the Keys unique environment of poor or little soil, highly porous limestone and elevated groundwater tables. The nutrients from the poorly treated sewage is contributing to water quality and aquatic life degradation and presents a human health risk from bacteria and viruses. Florida enacted legislation in 1999 requiring all sewage treatment facilities and onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems in the Florida Keys achieve advance wastewater treatment standards or best available technology as determined by Florida Department of Environmental Protection. EDU is equivalent to wastewater effluent from one home -- 167 gallons per day per home
Units: 
Universe:75,000 sewage treatment facilities and onsite treatment and disposal systems
Baseline:32,000 sewage treatment facilities and onsite treatment and disposal systems (FY 2009)


Most Recent Regional Measure Results Trend Data (From FY2010 End of Year Report, if available):
Measure Results Trend Data 


Most Recent National Results Trend Data Chart (From FY2010 End of Year Report, if available):
Measure Results Trend Data Chart 


ACS Measure History:
Fiscal YearACS CodeMeasure Description
2012SFL-1Increase percentage of sewage treatment facilities and onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems receiving advanced wastewater treatment or best available technology as recorded by EDU. in Florida Keys two percent (1500 EDUs) annually.
2011SL-1Increase percentage of sewage treatment facilities and onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems receiving advanced wastewater treatment or best available technology as recorded by EDU. in Florida Keys two percent (1500 EDUs) annually.


Decision History: Click for measure decision details


Data Sources and Data Quality and Limitations: 




External Links:
Congressional Justification
2010 EOY Report


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